!test popup 2 – Shavuot: Core Concepts — Elementor

THE 613 MITZVOT ENCOMPASSED IN THE FIRST COMMANDMENT

With Hashem’s revelation on Har Sinai, we only committed to 10 Commandments… how did our obligations mushroom into 613?… All of the mitzvot are included in those original ten…

[However] we actually only heard the first two commandments directly from Hashem:
Their revelation was so intense, [that] our souls flew from our bodies at each word. Hashem revived us with His resurrecting dew… We “died” over sixty times in those first two commandments. It was just too much, and finally we begged Moshe to be our intermediary and relay the message to us.

Even so… these first two Commandments, themselves, are comprehensive.
The First Commandment which declares the fact of God’s existence is the root of all the 248 positive directives.

The Second Commandment is the root of all 365 negative commandments. And really, says the midrash, both the positive and the negative are contained within the first one.

The Second Commandment is the root of all 365 negative commandments. And really, says the TEST 111, both the positive and the negative are contained within the first one.

THE FIRST COMMANDMENT: UNDERSTANDING THAT EVERYTHING COMES FROM GOD

If we really understood what it means that God is one, as expressed through the First Commandment, our instinctive and reflexive response to the world would always accord with [the Torah].

 

And so, the entire Torah is contained within the first commandment… Every Jewish soul heard these words straight from their Creator… 

The goal of our lives individually and collectively is to achieve an ever-deepening integration of what it means that G-d is one. And towards this end, says the midrash, Hashem restates this fundamental truth over and over and over again. Each day Hashem rebroadcasts the First Commandment out into the world. 

 

Why don’t we hear it? What keeps us from taking it in? 

 

If Hashem bothers to reiterate the First Commandment each day then we need to make the silent space to hear His message.

 

[However, making silent space can only come about through quiet, honest reflection on events without outside distractions. It is only through such a medium that we can consider the meaning of both individual and collective events that we have experienced and focus on the message. Such an experience, when done properly, can allow us to see that nothing happens by coincidence, and every step is part of Hashem’s plan.]

Alot Ha’shachar

Dawn or daybreak. This is the time when some sunlight starts to be visible on the horizon.

According to Torah law, any mitzva that must be performed by day (shofar, lulav, megilla, etc.) can be performed at alot ha’shachar; rabbinically, the performance of these mitzvot is generally delayed until sunrise. Communal fasts begin at alot ha’shachar and one may also recite Shacharit (the morning prayer) after this time in certain cases.
Classic Calculation of Alot Ha’shachar
  • Most opinions hold that alot ha’shachar is approximately seventy-two minutes before sunrise, while some hold it is approximately ninety minutes before sunrise.
Classic Calculation of Alot Ha’shachar
  • Most opinions hold that alot ha’shachar is approximately seventy-two minutes before sunrise, while some hold it is approximately ninety minutes before sunrise.
Calculation of Alot Ha’shachar Today
  • Today, many do not calculate the time based on the number of minutes before sunrise. Rather, the calculation of minutes refers to a “perfect day” (when sunrise and sunset are exactly 12 hours apart) in Jerusalem, which is equivalent to when the sun is a certain number of degrees below the horizon everywhere in the world. Therefore, alot ha’shachar is often calculated as whatever time the sun is positioned 16 degrees (72 minutes) or 19 degrees (90 minutes) below the horizon.
Communal Fasts
  • Communal fasts begin at alot ha’shachar, after which time one may not eat or drink. The exceptions to the rule are Yom Kippur and Tisha B’av, which begin at sunset the day before.
Shacharit After Alot Ha’shachar
  • Ideally, one should not begin the morning Shemoneh Esrei of Shacharit until after sunrise. In cases of need, one may recite it after the time known as “mi sheyakir” (when one can identify an acquaintance outside without any streetlights), and in cases of great need, one may recite it after alot ha’shachar.
  • The times for alot ha’shachar can be found for any location on any given date at www.myzmanim.com.
  • Further information on the subject is available at:
    1. https://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/134527/jewish/Zmanim-Briefly-Defined-and-Explained.htm
    2. https://outorah.org/p/41921/
    3. https://halachipedia.com/index.php?title=Reference_of_Measurements_in_Halacha
This note has been adapted from https://outorah.org/p/41921/ (level 1 and 2) and https://halachipedia.com/index.php?title=Reference_of_Measurements_in_Halacha (level 3).
!test popup 2 – Shavuot: Core Concepts — Elementor
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